SEVEN REASONS WHY
THE OAK GROVE SHOULD NOT BE DESTROYED
return  

SEVEN REASONS WHY THE OAK GROVE SHOULD NOT BE DESTROYED:

oak grove score board1. It is a Native American burial ground. Native American remains were found at the site in 1923 when the stadium was being built. UC Berkeley tried to hide this from the public but documentation was leaked by a conscious UCB employee.

2. It is a World War I Memorial site. The stadium and the Oak Grove are named in honor of Californians who died in World War I.

3. Berkeley City Law prohibits removing mature Coast Live Oaks. Coast Live Oaks are Protected Heritage Trees in the City of Berkeley. If UCB, the largest landowner in Berkeley, doesn't have to follow city ordinances, why should anyone else have to?

4. The new proposed development is adjacent to the (recently active) Hayward Fault, Since the tree-sit started on Dec. 2, there have been seven earthquakes (ranging from 2.0-4.2 on the Richter scale) on the Hayward fault which runs directly under Memorial Stadium.

hayward fault stadium map5. There are four lawsuits against UC Berkeley. A diverse group of institutions and organizations; the City of Berkeley, California Oaks Foundation, Panoramic Hill Association, and Save Tightwad Hill, are challenging the proposed development as being in violation of various regulations, including CEQA (California Environmental Quality Act), the Aiquist-Priolo Act, (earthquake fault proximity), and laws regarding emergency access and response requirements.

6. Global Warming is the biggest problem we face today. Cutting down old Oak (and other) trees accelerates warming and climate change. Replacing these trees with saplings does not come close to replacing the bio-mass lost.

7. There are other viable alternative sites for the facility. The athletic training facility can be built at Maxwell Field, with the playing surface maintained above, The parking lot at Bancroft/Fulton is another option. A third option is the building at 2223 Fulton St., which is in need of demolition. A further option is expansion at the Edwards Field site. These are only some of the many alternatives to building at the Oak Grove.

Berkeley Citizen © 2003-2017
All Rights Reserved